Lightning in a Bottle releases stacked lineup featuring Disclosure, Gramatik, Big Gigantic, Santigold, and more

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Lightning in a Bottle releases stacked lineup featuring Disclosure, Gramatik, Big Gigantic, Santigold, and moreLIB 2017 Aaron Glassman 3

Do LaB festival producers present a stacked lineup for this year’s Lightning in a Bottle music festival, featuring Disclosure, Santigold, Gramatik, Toro y Moi, Big Gigantic, Elohim, and Flying Lotus‘ 3D concert experience. Artists taking over the beloved Woogie stage include Lane 8, DJ Koze, Damian LazarusLutrell, Shiba San, Recondite live, and more. Bass heads will reunite at the low end-heavy thunder stage with sub-booming performances from G Jones, 1788-LCloZee, EPROM and Alix Perez’s SHADES project, the funk bass stylings of OPIUO, and more.

For the past five years, the festival took place at San Antonio Reservoir Recreation Area in Bradley, California; and the last two years were met tragically with the death of a festival attendee at each. Now, the festival has moved to a new venue at Buena Vista Lake in Central California, with lush, green pastures, a shaded tree line, and accessible shoreline that’s sure to bring festival-goers in full force.

Tickets are currently on sale for Lightning in a Bottle 2019. Purchase them here.

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Photo credit: Aaron Glassman

Disclosure, Justin Martin, Shiba San, FISHER, and more top Elements Lakewood’s 2019 lineup

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Disclosure, Justin Martin, Shiba San, FISHER, and more top Elements Lakewood’s 2019 lineupScreen Shot 2019 01 24 At 4.29.58 PM

As Elements Lakewood Music & Arts Festival looks ahead to its third iteration with the release of its 2019 lineup, the expression “the third time’s a charm” is particularly apt. Boasting a number of heavy hitters hailing from the house genre, Elements Lakewood’s lineup will bring Disclosure, FISHER, Shiba San, and Justin Martin to Elements’ Pennsylvania home, to script a bumping next chapter in the festival’s history of production. Spanning more than 100 artists in its totality, the festival’s 2019 lineup also sees Elements Lakewood organizers issue noteworthy nods to Big Gigantic, Sofi Tukker, Seth Troxler, Damian Lazarus, and Clozee, among other artists.

A favorite among camping enthusiasts, Elements Lakewood will once more blend talent from techno, bass, jam rock, funk, and other sub-genres on a sprawling 200-acre campground that offers attendees five different stages of musical diversion. Complete with wellness activities like aromatherapy and sunset yoga, not to mention a myriad of camp games including basketball and volleyball, Elements Lakewood ensures that attendees won’t spend a single second of their time at the event idle. In a credit to the diversity of Elements Lakewood’s offerings, event-goers will also have the opportunity to partake in kayak trips at sunset, water sports like canoeing and swimming, and post-dusk adventures like a stroll through a kaleidoscope light-decorated forest.

Back to offer the ultimate soul renewal experience in its seamless intermingling of outdoor fun and good music, Elements Lakewood is a bona fide must attend for 2019.

A limited number of early bird three-day GA and VIP passes to the festival’s 2019 edition are now available and can be purchased here.

Photo Credit: Julian Cassidy

Sunday Morning Medicine Vol. 156 with Moon Boots, Tchami, Nora En Pure + more

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Sunday Morning Medicine Vol. 156 with Moon Boots, Tchami, Nora En Pure + moreSmm@0.

Sunday Morning Medicine is a feature from Dancing Astronaut dedicated to the mellower side of electronic music. We bring you our favorite therapeutic selections — old and new — in attempts to alleviate the agonizing effects of a long weekend of partying.


For nearly two decades, Bonobo has been cultivating an easygoing sound, one that’s lush with balmy beats and calming instrumentals. This sonic stunner, “Kiara,” makes an appearance on the UK musician’s 2010 album, Black Sands.

Tchami‘s “Zeal” instantly captured the hearts of fans with its merry melody and grooving beat upon its release in 2017. The song’s infectious ambiance made it a clear standout on the French producer’s Revelations EP.

As the bonus track on Big Gigantic‘s 2010 LP of the same name, “A Place Behind the Moon” saw Big Gigantic in their finest form. The Colorado group brought along members of STS9 for this alluring collaboration that perfectly summed up the 12-track album.

In August 2017, Moon Boots revealed his debut album, First Landing. Its title track is deeply rooted house in rhythm and undertones of bass, maintaining a mellow and almost sultry sonic atmosphere throughout.

In Nora En Pure‘s “Tears In Your Eyes,” gorgeous strings and a delicate piano melody usher in an otherworldly beat and memorable vocal hook. This catchy Spinnin’ release was met with praise from the South African producer’s fan base  and rightly so.

NGHTMRE and Big Gigantic team up for ‘Like That’

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NGHTMRE and Big Gigantic team up for ‘Like That’Nghtmre Big Gigantic Credit Koury Angelo Jaon Siegle

NGHTMRE has had an incredible come-up since “Street” became the trap anthem of 2015. He’s been repped by Mad Decent, OWSLA, and Monstercat. At Lost Lands, he announced the launch of own label with SLANDER, Gud Vibrations, named after the artists’ collaboration. One would think NGHTMRE’s hands would be full, but apparently, that’s not the case.

The 28-year-old has teamed up with Big Gigantic to release a mosaic of jazz, funk, future bass: “Like That.” The festival pleaser has the makings of an anthem, kicking off with that classic Big G circus feel — flush with hip-hop beats, brass, and reminiscent of the golden era of jazz revitalized. However, “Like That” doesn’t stay in Big G’s world entirely. The drops are contemporary — more chiseled, more demanding — and they hold a meticulous touch of a producer who has felt the acceleration of exponential growth, made possible by NGHTMRE.

“Like That” is a solid collaboration that surpasses the standards of the many genres of electronica, especially in terms of big stage festival tracks.

Photo credit: Koury Angelo/Jason Siegle

NMF Roundup: KOAN Sound return with debut LP, Dillon Francis unleashes ‘LFGD,’ SNBRN remixes Hotel Garuda + more

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NMF Roundup: KOAN Sound return with debut LP, Dillon Francis unleashes ‘LFGD,’ SNBRN remixes Hotel Garuda + moreKoan Sound

It’s most important day of the week: New Music Friday. With the overwhelming amount of tunes hitting the airwaves today, Dancing Astronaut has you covered with the latest edition of The Hot 25.

The release of the NINJAWERKS Vol. 1 compilation album this week brings new tunes from some of dance music’s biggest names, including Dillon Francis and Kaskade. Andrew Bayer has joined forces with Ane Brun for the gorgeous “Love You More,” out on Anjunabeats. RL Grime has revealed a colossal set of remixes for NOVA, including a formidable rework of “Rainer” by k?d. KOAN Sound burst back onto the scene with the release their debut full-length, Polychrome. HEYZ works wonders in his new single with darkDARK, “Darkest Little Friend.” Hardwell delivers some sunshine in the form of “How You Love Me” with Conor Maynard and Snoop Dogg. Nicky Romero flips Jess Glynne‘s “Thursday” in his newest, and NGHTMRE and Big Gigantic make magic with “Like That.” Cloonee keeps the beat rocking with a feel-good take on Matoma‘s “Sunday Morning,” and Ekali strips “Leaving” down for a serene, acoustic rendition.

As each week brings a succession of new music from some of electronic music’s biggest artists, here’s a selection of tracks that shouldn’t be missed this NMF.

Louis The Child release playful new EP, ‘Kids At Play,’ featuring Big Gigantic, Elohim, Quinn XCII, NoMBe and more

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Louis The Child release playful new EP, ‘Kids At Play,’ featuring Big Gigantic, Elohim, Quinn XCII, NoMBe and moreLouis The Child Press By Cameron Postforoosh 2018 Billboard 1548

Louis the Child release an extensive nine-track EP, Kids At Play, inviting listeners to their sonic playground filled with sultry harmonies, soulful wonderment, unique sounds, and youthful fervor. Colorful sounds ooze out of , from the tropical steel drums on “Better Not” featuring Wafia to the blue guitar twangs on “Save Me From Myself” with NoMBe and Big Gigantic. These two kids from Chicago showcase their electronic dance-pop crossover skills on what could have easily been a full-length.

Genre bending and intelligent synth design becomes apparent through each of the EP’s distinctive tracks. “Interstellar” features a dynamic and glitchy arrangement that feels fitting of its futuristic name. “Braking News,” featuring RAYE, implies a playful relationship between the collaborators with rolling synths and hi hats that create a bounce in their step.

The Wafia-assisted “Better Not” featuring Wafia was the first track released off the project, amassing to a total of 72.5 million plays on Spotify, the duo’s most listened to track on the platform to date.  “Ohhh Baby” is quite the percussive piece, illustrating an organized chaos similar to an uplifting G Jones. “LOVE” featuring Elohim is the second collaboration between the two, the first being “Love is Alive.” The chorus features the West LA Children’s Choir, adding to the album’s childish delight.

“Dear Sense” features the soulful vocals of MAX and offers an LCD Soundsystem feel. “The City” featuring Quinn XCII offers bouncing melodies and punching percussions underneath a fervent voice. “Save Me From Myself” features EDM’s sax man, Big Gigantic, and the R&B clad, NoMBE. The acoustic guitar creates a campfire feel that drops into big, emotive synths, spaced out for effect. “Space Jam” contains a classic Louis The Child synth feel, sounding similar to an old-school 90s video game with frolicsome percussive elements. Listen to Kids At Play by Louis The Child below.

 

Photo Credit: Cameron Postforoosh

Soul delving with Shallou: producer talks production of ‘Souls’ EP, translating musical vision to live performance [Interview]

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Soul delving with Shallou: producer talks production of ‘Souls’ EP, translating musical vision to live performance [Interview]Screen Shot 2018 04 29 At 11.17.42 AM

The expression goes that the eyes “are the windows to the soul,” but when it comes to Shallou, Souls is the “window” to sonic narrativization.

Released in April 2018, Souls set out to translate the cyclical intimacies and distances of a relationship into song. A delve further into a distinctive style of electronic sound comprised of indie, dream-pop, and ambient house constructions, Souls duly emerged as a refined conceptual project that showcased Shallou’s deftness in melding elements of different genres, and related a romantically centered story without total reliance on lyrical expression.

The romantic nature of the seven-track EP’s narrative focus is apparent in individual song titles like “You and Me,” “…Lost,” and “Lie,” but for some of the tracks on the EP like “Sigh” and “…Lost,” the titles provide the only concrete words found in relation to the given song, leaving technical elements like BPM tempo and instrumental tone to do the expressive work that lyrics typically perform. “You and Me,” Kasbo and Cody Lovaas feature, “Find,” “Vignette,”  “Lie,” and “Skin” by contrast offer listeners lyrically concrete developments in the at times tenuous relationship between the fictional lovers.

The production of an EP can parallel the course of a relationship in that the artist too might drift from and return to the project in the same way that one of the hypothetical lovers on Souls strays from the other, only to flutter back in time. Curious about Shallou’s in-studio approach to crafting Souls, Dancing Astronaut caught up with the producer to talk Souls’ track by track conception, and how Shallou’s musical vision translates to his live performances as the LA talent prepares for a slew of headlining fall tour dates.

Listeners can catch Shallou at Breakaway Music Festival on August 26. Learn more about the festival, here.

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Dancing Astronaut: Can you talk a little bit about your vision for your most recent EP, Souls?

Shallou: Souls was a pivotal project for me because I wanted to flesh out some of the visual and sonic ideas from the All Becomes Okay EP. Music-wise, these songs have more traditional song forms, some pop-appeal, while keeping the ambient instrumental aspects that helped me reach an audience in the first place. Visually, the artwork continues to build out this world the little character in the corner is exploring. I wanted to blend my favorite things about indie, dream-pop, ambient and dance into something that felt different in the electronic space, but something unique that doesn’t overly focus on drops. I wanted to create my own beautiful sound without limiting it to the edm world. Electronic music shaped me as a producer, but I have a deep love for folk and indie rock as well which I showcased in the Souls Sessions that just came out on Youtube. 

The idea of ‘Souls’ came from this idea of collaboration and exploring the intimacy of a relationship with the help of other artists and singers. Each song has its own story of love blooming or caught in flux, some lyrics expressing concrete emotions (“Lie”;”You and Me”) and some more ethereal concepts (“Vignette”, “Sigh”). “Souls” expresses the intense moments of intimacy and distance that come with every long-term relationship. With All Becomes Okay, I was inspired by the concept of the cycle of life (hence the Soul delving with Shallou: producer talks production of ‘Souls’ EP, translating musical vision to live performance [Interview]1f30eSoul delving with Shallou: producer talks production of ‘Souls’ EP, translating musical vision to live performance [Interview]1f311Soul delving with Shallou: producer talks production of ‘Souls’ EP, translating musical vision to live performance [Interview]1f331 all over my social media) but with Souls I was inspired by the concept of the cycle of a relationship.

Dancing Astronaut: Being that the EP tells a sonic story of two lovers who both gravitate towards one another and experience disconnects, I’m really interested to hear how you approached the EP’s production. Did you sequentially craft this story song by song, tailoring each individual song to the sonic narrative? Or did you produce these songs in a more random order, later finding a way to make them dovetail to tell this story? I’m curious about the extent to which the concept influenced the order in which you produced the EP’s 7 tracks.

Shallou: The EP story kind of just came together that way. I feel like everyone’s writing instinct is to speak about their love and relationships, so the songs with features came together first. I was then able to piece together a story from those singles and tracks that were written by just me specifically for the EP (i.e. Vignette, Sigh, Lost). I think the best way to craft a story is to just start with your instinct and see where it takes you creatively. Its much easier to make things for a story that happens naturally then to try and make a story from scratch. I sequenced the songs by key as well. Sigh was an intro I had been sitting on for a long time and I used that key and certain ideas from it to create the instrumental for “Find” w/Kasbo. Same with Vignette. “Lost” functioned as a sort of instrumental intro to “Lie” because they shared keys as well. 

Dancing Astronaut: Can you also talk a little about how your production of this EP differed (in any way) from your debut EP, All Becomes Okay, released back in 2017?

Shallou: The production on this EP has higher BPM counts, and thus a little more energy. For example, “Vignette” is 120 and “You and Me” is 113 which are my highest tempos yet. I think overall this EP is a little bit dancier and more vocal heavy. I think its easier for people to relate to tracks with vocals on them, evidenced by the recent explosion of producer-singer/rapper collabs across all genres. I really enjoy aspects of that trend and I wanted each track to have a perfect marriage of vocal + instrumental, some by throwing some of my own vocals chopped up in there so they feel like truly “our” songs.

Dancing Astronaut: You’ve clearly carved out a niche for yourself in ambient house circles, and there’s an inimitable indie influence that’s perceptible in your productions. You recently toured alongside Big Gigantic and played some of your very first headlining shows. What’s been most important to you when it comes to playing these headlining dates—do you have a specific vision for your live shows in terms of the ambience or production involved in these show dates?

Shallou: I have to admit I was a little intimidated going out with Big Gigantic. I had never seen them before and everyone had told me their set went very hard. My music is admittedly pretty chill across the board. I took that as inspiration to make a live-hybrid set. I added a drummer and amped up some of my slower songs to try and grab the audience more. I was really surprised by the crowd’s positive reaction; they were really there to have a good time and dance. I think thats the point of going to see a show; you want to feel excited and involved and I’ve kept that as a major element of my performance ever since. I’m excited to show this next tour how I’ve grown as a performer. I’m still singing live, playing keys and performing all my own music, but focusing on creating “moments” for the audience Theres moments for the ambient fans and dance fans alike. For production, we’re looking to make it as unique as possible, and try to bring the world from my artwork to life for people who have been following me since the beginning. Telling a story is a very important thing for me.

NMF Roundup: The Glitch Mob slows things down, Borgeous reups Marshmello, ATTLAS stuns, Daniel Avery delivers + more

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The most important day of every week: New Music Friday. As each week brings a succession of new music from some of electronic music’s biggest artists, here’s a selection of tracks that shouldn’t be missed.


Break out your Tigers Beat: The White Panda elevates the hottest rising boy band, save for Brockhampton, lifting Why Don’t We’s empowering hit single “Trust Fund Baby” to newfound heights with an injection of feel-good vibes and upbeat danceability that beckons innumerable repeats.

Raito digs into a bag of old-school garage tricks with a burgeoning breakbeat remix of Virtual Self‘s hyperactive, fantasy-themed electronic “Ghost Voices,” transforming the number into an even heavier, drum-sweltering beast.

Borgeous reupholsters Marshmello‘s “FRIENDS” with a most passionate swatch, ditching the track’s acoustics, and accentuating its passionate lyrics tenfold.

Ashley Wallbridge‘s uplifting Gareth Emery rework and effervescent trance tune aligns itself with an era of Armada‘s finest amidst its formal release.

With the vocal help of Tima Dee, Fareoh asserts his versatile studio reign once more.

Midnight Kids consider Shaun Frank‘s “Addicted” in a compelling new ’80s-centric dance-heavy decorum.

Big Gigantic ushers everyone to the dancefloor with a groovy new take on The KnocksFoster The People collaboration.

Though the track’s title and lyrical content is lacking sincere cerebral depth, SNBRN coalesces Peking Duk‘s “Wasted” into a digestible summertime tune, making the number’s monotone vocals and cringeworthy frat bro vibes a smaller, but bearable pill to swallow.

Marcel Dettman‘s burgeoning warehouse Mount Kimbie remix of “Four Years And One Day” meets streaming services as a meticulously crafted far cry from its shoegazey original.

The Glitch Mob slow things down with Elohim, showcasing their softer side, and highlighting their carefully calculated production capabilities.

Junior Sanchez embodies the essence that’s come to define him on “Forget” — always moving forward, without ever losing sight of where he’s been.

Sofi Tukker busts out a thrashing, ridiculously colorful new tune ahead of their debut album Treehouse out next Friday, April 13, elevating its anticipation to unforeseen heights.

ATTLAS is at home in the treetops and ensures listeners his glittery techno is a style which will only continue to define an era of mau5trap in years to come.

At long last Chris Lake has found his mind…. It seems this beat has taken it, and we’re glad to finally have it back, even if it was just for the sake of this one tantalizing tune.

Daniel Avery’s cavernous, contemplative techno album Song For Alpha has arrived. Perhaps best encapsulating the aforementioned, “Glitter” is a flurry from the club space, rife with atmosphere, and embedded influence of the greats that came before him.

Saving the best for last, Icelandic multi-instrumentalist and composer Ólafur Arnalds bestows his latest sonic gift “re:member.” Enough said.

Outside Lands reveals The Weeknd, ODESZA, DJ Snake, Jamie xx & more atop 2018 bill

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Outsidelands 2015

Outside Lands has revealed the 2018 lineup for its 11th installment in San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park August 10-12.

Following a fervent 2017 edition of Gorillaz, The Who, and Metallica headlining, 2018 boasts a hefty onslaught of acts, and although the headliners see earlier appearances in the festival season  — The Weeknd at Coachella and Janet Jackson at both Panorama and FYF Fest  — the lineup remains rife with talent and excitement.

The Weeknd is set to perform, where he’s likely to play out his recent slew of new material which features the aid of Nicolas Jaar, Daft Punk‘s Guy-Manuel de Homem-Christo, and Gesaffelstein. Both Florence + The Machine and Janet Jackson front the bill with performances that will be nothing less than excellent and the lineup also promises a plethora of beloved dance acts. From ODESZA, Chromeo, and Claptone, to DJ Snake, Jamie xx, Tycho, CHVRCHES, James Blake, Gryffin, Lauv, and Whethan, Outside Lands is a music lover’s oeuvre in its late-summer installment.

More information and tickets, which are available starting at 10 a.m. PST April 5, can be found here.

Outside-Lands-2018

How Superfly’s inaugural Lost Lake Festival put Phoenix on the map as the next big festival spot in the U.S.

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How Superfly’s inaugural Lost Lake Festival put Phoenix on the map as the next big festival spot in the U.S.

This fall, Superfly Presents, the masterminds behind North American festival giants Outside Lands and Bonnaroo set their scopes on a new, emerging entertainment market that they were banking on being the next big festival-hosting city in the United States: Phoenix, Arizona. While most picture Phoenix with a skewed vision of the “wild west,” Superfly was planting its flag in a burgeoning hub of vibrant art, food, local music, and tourism marketability as the home for their newest concept, Lost Lake Festival. The result was not only another overwhelmingly successful event for the organizers, but in turn, positioned Phoenix to strongly attract additional large scale events in coming years to coincide with the city’s exciting, growing social scene. If Phoenix wasn’t on the festival map before, Lost Lake unquestionably changed that notion. The inaugural Lost Lake didn’t just bring in an enticing lineup and top-tier liquor sponsors, the event was a masterfully curated three-day experience, from logistics to programming, that used the host city’s aesthetic as an intrinsic factor in the festival’s appeal.

Image: Jorgensen Photography

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Stellar inaugural lineup

Led by top-notch headliners that included Chance The Rapper, The Killers, and Major Lazer, Lost Lake delivered a well-rounded blend of talent that paired top electronic acts like Odesza and Big Gigantic with satisfying, multi-generational tastes of hip-hop from Lil Yachty to Ludacris. Folk rockettes HAIM performed one of the highlight sets of the weekend, along with a raucous showcase from Run The Jewels and a lesson in R&B excellence from The Roots. The lineup curation was designed to span the spectrum, from Huey Lewis and the News to A Tribe Called Red with so many genre-hopping performances in between. What’s more, local Phoenicians and Phoenix-bred acts like Playboy Manbaby, Kongos, and Bogan Via shared the stage with nationally touring acts including Tritonal, Danny Brown, and Crystal Castles, celebrating the city’s animated music and arts scenes, hopefully encouraging other large-scale festivals across the country to adopt similar programming practices.

Image: Quinsey Sablan

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Big on local programming

Beyond a phenomenal three-day lineup, Lost Lake applied heavy emphasis to balancing the inherent corporate sponsorships that come with a large-scale music event with locally sourced arts, attractions, and businesses tucked into their FOUND Marketplace. Lost Lake also incorporated interactive art installations across the festival grounds at Steele Indian School Park located in central downtown Phoenix. From pyrotechnic lilypads floating across the venue’s serene lake to paintings created by some of Phoenix’s top muralists sprinkled throughout the grounds, Lost Lake was a sight to behold. When fans weren’t busy enjoying life-sized LED playground equipment and backyard games, attendees could peruse local bar and restaurant options that lined the event’s concession areas, pushing Phoenix’s developing culinary culture to the masses.  Lost Lake honed in on the city’s local charm with complementary programming that immediately established Phoenix’s character as a major element to the new festival brand’s identity.

Image: Jeff Kravitz

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Perfect location, aced logisitics

Most large-scale festival events struggle with logistics planning, even beyond their infancy. None are immune to all production issues, however Lost Lake’s inaugural run proved to be incredibly calculated and organized, even as it ran directly anchored in the heart of Phoenix’s downtown district. No training wheels necessary. Public transit access ran without a hitch, and on-the-ground festival operations were aced. Attendees were well-informed and considerately directed by festival staff, and local infrastructure was more than adequately prepared to accommodate Superfly’s Arizona debut. On-site logistics were matched by a pristine venue, and Arizona’s mid-80’s autumn season proved to be a perfectly pleasant festival backdrop. Other events that have tried to stake their claim in Phoenix have suffered from incredibly poor planning, unsavory venue selections, and even worse weather, though Lost Lake managed to navigate Phoenix’s stereotypical “drawbacks” with near perfection. Trash and recycling receptacles dotted every free space at the festival, again encouraging similarly scaled events to take similar measures not only for the attendance experience, but also out of respect for the city and the venue alike. The result made a profound difference.

Image: Jorgensen Photography

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Keep your eyes on Phoenix

Superfly Presents has already established itself as one of the top names in the business, putting on some of the most sought-after events of the year in North America. Expanding their vision to include a largely untapped market in Phoenix proved to be a significantly successful move, and likely put Phoenix on the map in a major way. And while other dance-centric festival events have sprung up in Phoenix in recent years, like Goldrush Festival, Mad Decent Block Parties, and Decadence offshoots, Lost Lake brought an entirely different vibe to Phoenix that included a heavy appreciation for the city’s narrative and identity, and likely lit the beacon for other major cross-genre multi-day events to begin flocking to the Southwest too.

Image: Jorgensen Photography