Parookaville announces first wave of headliners including Dimitri Vegas & Like Mike, Armin van Buuren, Salvatore Ganacci

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Parookaville announces first wave of headliners including Dimitri Vegas & Like Mike, Armin van Buuren, Salvatore GanacciParookaville Mainstage

Germany’s largest electronic music festival Parookaville will be returning to Weeze for its sixth edition, and now the festival is releasing its first wave of 2020 headliners to get fans excited for the forthcoming event.

Dimitri Vegas & Like Mike, Armin van Buuren, Neelix, and Salvatore Ganacci are among the first main stage artists announced for 2020. REZZ, Cosmic Gate, Markus Schulz, and Yves V are also among the featured artists on other stages throughout the festival that have been announced.

The festival attracted over 210,000 attendees in 2019, and in 2020 attendees can look forward to a completely new main stage design to enhance the festival’s experience. These headliners are the first of over 300 featured artists that will be announced for the event. Parookaville is set to take place from 17 July to 19 July 2020, and tickets can be purchased here.

Featured image: Saskia Gauke

Nicky Romero puts anthemic spin on Armin van Buuren’s ‘Unlove You’

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Nicky Romero puts anthemic spin on Armin van Buuren’s ‘Unlove You’Nicky Romero Press Shot

Armin van Buuren’s “Unlove You” has received the Nicky Romero treatment. A staple of the trance tastemaker’s seventh studio album, “Unlove You” melded mid-tempo electronic with Ne-Yo’s R&B finesse. Sitting in languid contrast to some of the LP’s higher-octane inclusions, “Unlove You” offered a reprieve from the main stage-centric sound that van Buuren channeled on Balance.

Romero’s revamp arrives as the animated sonic sister to van Buuren’s original. Boasting a bubbly musical personality, the alternative version that Romero puts forth concentrates its revision in the song’s chord boosted ascents and descents. Romero melodically lifts “Unlove You,” transforming it into an upbeat tune that is designed for live sets. Tasteful and sparing in his alterations, Romero preserves the rest of “Unlove You’s” frame in his club-suitable spin.

Featured image: Darryl Adelaar

NMF Roundup: RÜFÜS DU SOL remix Foals, deadmau5 unleashes another single, ‘FALL’ + more

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NMF Roundup: RÜFÜS DU SOL remix Foals, deadmau5 unleashes another single, ‘FALL’ + moreRUFUS PressShot LeFawnhawk 1

It’s most important day of the week: New Music Friday. With the overwhelming amount of tunes hitting the airwaves today, Dancing Astronaut has you covered with the latest edition of The Hot 25.

As each week brings a succession of new music from some of electronic music’s biggest artists, here’s a selection of tracks that shouldn’t be missed this NMF.

Photo credit: LeFawnhawk

EDC Mexico reveals 2020 lineup featuring Diplo, Tiësto, Knife Party, Madeon, and more

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EDC Mexico reveals 2020 lineup featuring Diplo, Tiësto, Knife Party, Madeon, and moreScreen Shot 2018 11 21 At 9.53.42 AM

Less than a day before EDC Orlando 2019, Insomniac has revealed the full lineup for EDC Mexico 2020. Returning for a seventh iteration, EDC Mexico will take place at its home venue Autódromo Hermanos Rodríguez from Feb. 28-March 1 as a three-day event this time around. In concurrence with its other Insomniac variations, EDC Mexico’s lineup packs a punch in offering an extensive selection of acts across all genres—featuring a spectrum from mainstream artists to rising talent and everything in between.

Diplo, Tiësto, Armin van Buuren, Zedd, and David Guetta are among a few of many DJs gracing the festival’s bookings, as well as comeback artists like Knife Party and Madeon. Other beloved artists including Carl Cox, Vini Vici, Giuseppe Ottaviani, Walker & Royce, and Wax Motif are also slated to perform.

Tickets for EDC Mexico 2020 are on sale here. General admission three-day passes begin at $1,950 MXN. The Comfort Pass, PLUS • Enhanced Experience Pass, and SkyDeck package are also available to purchase.

Discovering Amsterdam through ADE’s wide venue menu [2019 Review]

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Discovering Amsterdam through ADE’s wide venue menu [2019 Review]ADE Laura Siliquini

Words by: Josh Stewart & Bella Bagshaw

For a festival older than many of its attendees (including a co-author of this review), Amsterdam Dance Event hasn’t lost an ounce of prerogative in the electronic music space across its 24-year tenure. Much like its increasingly international soil, ADE is voraciously traveled to by electronic infatuates across the globe. This year the industry-oriented endeavor garnered attendees from 146 countries—the most internationally visited installment to date.

But what makes ADE so painfully cool, is not only its chromatic agenda—spanning panels, parties, makeshift productions, and larger-than-life arena stops—but its locational litany. From train stations, to museums, to the warehouse spots, all of Amsterdam is ADE’s playground.

And it feels like the whole city is participating, too. Right outside the Schipol Airport, your humble narrator is greeted by a proverbial ADE cube humming above an information/check-in hut, ready for business at 8 am sharp. Once I secure my media pass, a 40-something cab driver promptly rattles off his week’s after-dark itinerary, with the enthusiasm of a tourist and the precision of a seasoned attendee.

ADE is unique in that it implores you to acquaint yourself with Amsterdam. It’s an unfettered celebration among the city’s quotidian. And that’s undoubtedly why the very best of the dance music business (Garrix, Tiesto, Guetta, Knight, Hawtin, Brejcha, you name it) return year after year. Here are some spots that made ADE sing this year.

Rijksmuseum

Rijksmuseum, Dancing Astronaut‘s quintessential stop on the ADE agenda. The storied subterranean dwelling of the historic Dutch landmark make for a sublime dance music backdrop—invoking elegance and clandestine cadence all at once. Raw Rave sanctioned Boys Noize Thursday night for a long dance (the kinetic vernacular in Europe is actually swaying) in the dark, as Maceo Plex and Underworld had so notably done just a few years prior.

The hallowed columns cast great, oblong shadows through the crowd, while fog dances in time with Boys Noize‘s beguiling analog techno. It’s an altogether post-apocalyptic display; as if all the wide-eyed pedestrians who normally flood the area by day are gone for good and there’s nothing left to do but soak up the smoke and party (if you can maneuver to the bar, that is). The air buzzed with sweet and sweaty malice, beneath a collection of Rembrandts resting soundly upstairs, no less! The historic holdings are a smoldering embodiment of ADE’s ability to make Amsterdam’s cornerstone conventions come alive.

Paradiso

Of all the Amsterdam club locales, Paradiso is likely the most atmospherically adjacent to a US spot ADE has to offer. Though, its architectural grandeur is singularly European. The assuredly haunted ex-church, with its resplendent stained glass windows and intricately etched balcony arrangement, seems destined for a back-to-back DJ set from priest vestment-donning Tchami and his perpetually pernicious aural associate, Malaa. A far cry from the litany of icons Paradiso once welcomed—The Rolling Stones, Prince, Patti Smith, The Cure, Nirvana (just to name a few)—the duo’s Dutch rendition of No Redemption was, nonetheless, entertaining as hell.

The hard-house maestros topped giant LED cubes which lit up in sync with painstakingly on-brand visuals when the respective DJ took his turn. For Tchami, a storming jungle scene evocative of his recent melodic house sensation, “Rainforest.” For Malaa, the expected illicit and explicit imagery: lines of white powder, skin-clad, ski-masked women, and otherwise. PSA: Moshing to dance music is apparently not just an American phenomenon.

Above section by: Bella Bagshaw

Armada Office

Days before the release of his 7th studio albumArmin van Buuren opened the doors to Armada’s office, sitting on the city’s outskirts for a cranked-up ADE-themed recording of A State Of Trance. Attendees were welcome to wander the corridors of the iconic trance label’s home base, with over two dozen guest sets spinning between “The Club” and the infamous recording studio where Armin streams his weekly shows. The who’s who of trance ticket gave fans a chance to see tastemaker after tastemaker, mainstay after mainstay, bringing the likes of Richard DurandMarkus SchulzFerry CorstenSander van Doorn, and even BT, for eight hours of intimate trance bliss.   

NDSM Wharf

DGTL brought four nights of ADE-insanity to NDSM Wharf, a former shipyard with grounds big enough to house 10 soccer fields. As massive of a venue as it was, another few soccer fields probably could’ve housed the droves of ravers who kept the waterfront warehouse’s sprawling mainstage saturated. A headlining lineup of Richie HawtinRÜFÜS DU SOLBonoboOrbital, and Ben Klock back to back with Marcel Dettmann proved too tempting a ticket for thousands of ADEers. There’s no doubt that the music is the focal point of a week like ADE, but it’s hard not to see the event for the grand portrait of dance music that is when showing up to NDSM. Between the ferry from Central Station, that showcases much of the city’s forward-thinking architecture, to the street art that blankets the hip, developing wharf, and fresh fruit the warehouse served until wee hours of the morning, a trip to NDSM shines a light on many of the enchanting idiosyncrasies that make ADE so distinctly Amsterdam.

Discovering Amsterdam through ADE’s wide venue menu [2019 Review]TIMBUITING NDSM Ade
Photo: Tim Buiting/NDSM

Lil’ Central Station

ADE fever even spread to Amsterdam’s very own Central Station (think Grand Central), which was effectively party-fied by Audio Obscura for the whirlwind weekend. Tucked just a few stories below the rails that funnel people in and out of Amsterdam by the thousands was Lil’ Central, a cozy nightclub space with DJs that encouraged a bit of loco and a lot of motion. From Motor City Drum Ensemble‘s swerve-inducing Thursday night set to Tchami‘s afterparty the following evening, express tickets to a good time were wholesale at Lil’ Central. Every city has nightclubs, most even have particularly cool ones, but how many municipalities are willing to turn their central transport hub into an all-night rave?

I can only think of one.

Above section by: Josh Stewart

Photo Credit: Laura Siliquini

Lunar Lunes: R3HAB reveals new CYB3RPVNK single, Madeaux releases ‘ME & U’ + more

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Lunar Lunes: R3HAB reveals new CYB3RPVNK single, Madeaux releases ‘ME & U’ + moreR3hab 4

Each week, New Music Friday sweeps through with torrential force, showering streaming platforms with immeasurable amounts of new tunes. Just like Dancing Astronaut rounds up 25 of the biggest songs of the week for the Hot 25 Spotify playlist each New Music Friday, Lunar Lunes serves as a landing pad for SoundCloud users who want a whole new dose of tunes to kick off the work week.

The selection is updated every Lunes (Monday).

Photo credit: Tony Cottrell Photography

Armin van Buuren’s 7th studio album heeds its name: ‘Balance’ [Album Review]

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Armin van Buuren’s 7th studio album heeds its name: ‘Balance’ [Album Review]ArminvanBuuren MiamiDag4 BartHeemskerk 11 Socials

Seven is widely heralded to be among the luckiest of numbers, but luck really has nothing to do with the release of Armin van Buuren‘s seventh studio album, Balance.

Rather, Balance emblematizes the artistic diligence that has ceaselessly driven the van Buuren project forward since the producer made his debut, 76, in 2003. A producer does not put forth seven incisive studio albums by resting on his laurels, after all, and van Buuren has never been known to do so. The trail of Balance predecessors, Shivers (2005), Imagine (2008), Mirage (2010), Intense (2013), and Embrace (2015) are ample proof of van Buuren’s exhaustive commitment to the electronic craft. Moons Of Jupiter (2019), his longtime collaborative effort, GAIA’s inaugural longform outing, adds good measure.

Balance is four months Moons Of Jupiter’s junior, and, sitting at 28 total tracks, the compilation album is a formidable followup to van Buuren’s June effort alongside GAIA partner, Benno de Goeij. Moons Of Jupiter‘s track list comprises 42 cuts. The sheer expanse of the album would typically warrant a sizable break for van Buuren longer than four months well-deserved, and perhaps even expected. Not so, he says, with the debut of Balance, and to that we say to trance’s tried-and-true trance champion, welcome back.

The dexterity of van Buuren’s production, paired with his acute ear for the radio-driven commercial dance sound that befits the airwaves and the Main Stage alike have never been more apparent before Balance. Neatly packaged along other subgenre canvassing, the Ne-Yo-assisted “Unlove You” and the David Hodges feature, “Waking Up With You” exude van Buuren’s affinity for the larger-than-life dance-pop dominion.

And with the same stroke of his pen, van Buuren effortlessly turns the musical tables with inclusions that scale trance’s stylistic continuum, such as “Don’t Let Me Go,” which situates van Buuren in his beloved progressive trance wheelhouse. He’s comfortable there—of course. But our faithful maestro recognizes the reward in stretching towards the unknown. The delight of Balance is the question that it begs: does van Buuren even have a sonic comfort zone anymore? If he does, it’s nearly impossible to discern along the chromatic length of the LP’s nuanced numbers. From the funky plucks and whistling vocoder of “Sex, Love & Water” to the porcelain piano melodies and synth-line ferocity of “Show Me Love,” van Buuren is proving he trembles at the foot of no aural opportunity.

Creating ‘Balance’ was a great journey for me to be able to reflect the new chapters in my life, have a really good time working with legendary artists, and making new sounds while still giving fans my signature trance sound.

-AVB

Balance, as just one singular stream of the album in its entirety will illuminate the veracity of its title—not just in name, but in its design. With its broad assembly of dance styles, anthemic chord progressions, vocal-centric constructions, and ear-catching lyrical concepts and hooks, that, across the studio showing, resonate poignantly or spike listeners’ adrenaline (often both successively), depending on the tune, among other trappings. Balance is proof not only of van Buuren’s creativity, but also of his experimental ardor.

Listeners can catch van Buuren on the North American Balance Tour beginning January 22.

Read Dancing Astronaut’s interview with Armin van Buuren on the release of GAIA’s Moons Of Jupiter album, here.

Photo credit: Bart Heemskerk

NMF Roundup: Valentino Khan remixes Tchami, Gryffin teams up with Maia Wright + more

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NMF Roundup: Valentino Khan remixes Tchami, Gryffin teams up with Maia Wright + moreValentino Khan 3 White Rabbit

It’s most important day of the week: New Music Friday. With the overwhelming amount of tunes hitting the airwaves today, Dancing Astronaut has you covered with the latest edition of The Hot 25.

Valentino Khan tackles Tchami’s “Rainforest” in his latest remix, and Gryffin teams up with Maia Wright for “Body Back.” Lost Kings tap Marc E. Bassy for “Somebody Out There,” and Adventure Club unveil their Death or Glory Sessions. David Guetta remixes Idris Elba’s “On Life” as Jack Back, and Sullivan King reveals his debut album, including tracks like “If My Eyes Are Vampires (Your Body Is My Sunlight)” with TYNAN. Fox Stevenson, too, has a debut album out on Oct. 18, featuring songs like “All Night,” and Hardwell teams up with Deorro, MAKJ, and Fatman Scoop for “Left Right.” Henry Fong encourages listeners to “Jump Up” with his new single, and Flosstradamus and Megatone deliver “Bounce Back” after premiering the track with DA. Faux Tales has released his ethereal Hiraeth LP, and Madnap and Luma have collaborated on “Faces.” YehMe2 and Wuki “Throw It” on their new collaboration, and vowl. and Brock Wilson jointly release “recluse.” Justin Jay puts his own spin on NGHTMRE and A$AP Ferg’s “REDLIGHT,” and Boombox Cartel and Griff Clawson reveal “All I Want.”

As each week brings a succession of new music from some of electronic music’s biggest artists, here’s a selection of tracks that shouldn’t be missed this NMF.

Photo credit: White Rabbit

Tomorrowland continues its 15th anniversary at ADE with stacked Ziggo Dome lineup

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Tomorrowland continues its 15th anniversary at ADE with stacked Ziggo Dome lineupDimitri Vegas Like Mike Tomorrowland 2018 EP

2019 marks the 15th anniversary of world-renowned Tomorrowland Music Festival, and just because this year’s iteration of the fan-facing festival is over, doesn’t mean the celebration of the organization’s anniversary is. Tomorrowland is continuing the celebration with a two-day takeover of Amsterdam’s Ziggo Dome during Amsterdam Dance Event (ADE). This is the Tomorrowland’s first time putting on a show at ADE, and on Oct. 17 and 18 there will be a two-day specially curated performance united by the theme: Our Story.

The event welcomes some of the biggest headliners from the festival’s history to the event, which includes Afrojack, Armin van Buuren, Dimitri Vegas & Like Mike, Steve Aoki, and Tiësto, to name a few. The event will also feature the Metropole Orchestra, whose students performed renditions of electronic music classics at the July edition of Tomorrowland.

Our Story takes place over two days, and the Ziggo dome features a 17,000-person capacity stadium. For those looking to attend Tomorrowland’s continued celebration of its 15-year anniversary, tickets are available here.

Photo credit: @boythecollector/Instagram

Armin van Buuren releases sixth single from forthcoming album, ‘All Comes Down,’ featuring Cimo Fränkel

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Armin van Buuren releases sixth single from forthcoming album, ‘All Comes Down,’ featuring Cimo FränkelArminvanBuuren MiamiDag4 BartHeemskerk 111 Socials

Armin van Buuren can’t stay out of the headlines with a stream of single releases ahead of his first album release since 2015 and seventh album overall. The compilation, which is titled Balance, will be released in full on Oct. 25, and the producer has put out the next single from the album, “All Comes Down.” The track features Cimo Fränkel, whose vocals have been a popular choice as of late for electronic music tracks, the most recent of which is Arty‘s single release, “Daydreams,” on Armada Music. It is van Buuren’s second time collaborating with the vocalist after first release “Strong Ones.”

Van Buuren has put out an acoustic and original version of the song, both of which put Fränkel’s vocals front and center from the release’s outset. The original sees the producer revert back to his trance roots with ethereal notes that transport the listener to an otherworldly release of emotion as the introduction transitions to the drop. The track is able to take the listener to the peak moment of euphoria during one of van Buuren’s live sets within the minute-long cascading note progression between Fränkel’s polarizing vocals. The acoustic version heavily leans on piano notes that dance around the vocals, instilling a sense of calm in the listener compared to the upbeat energy of the original.

“All Comes Down” is the sixth single from Balance to be released, and it’s out now via Armada Music.

Photo credit: Bart Heemskerk