Anenon’s ‘Two for C’ is a hauntingly gorgeous refrain

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Producer Brian Simon stuns on his latest release as Anenon. “Two for C” taps into the producer’s keen ability to weave disparate influences into cohesive, lush, and atmospheric pieces. The hauntingly ethereal track shimmers with otherworldly beauty as almost elegiac instrumental melodies carry it forward.

If “Two for C” is any indication, Simon’s forthcoming EP Tongue — out February 9 via Friends of Friends  — will be exactly the lush melange of neo-classical, jazz, and ambient electronic elements fans have been waiting for.


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Jono Ma & Dreems release ambient beauty, ‘Can’t Stop My Dreaming (Of You)’

Jono Ma & Dreems release ambient beauty, ‘Can’t Stop My Dreaming (Of You)’

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Australian dream team Jono Ma (of Jagwar Ma) and Angus Gruzman (of Dreems and Die Orangen) present The Dreemas, an EP that will be out mid-January via Kompakt. Jono Ma and Dreems have teamed up to create a minimalist piece full of ambient vibes and glowing melodies. “Can’t Stop My Dreaming” is notable for its downtempo, relaxed sound which showcases rumbling excerpts of bass and intriguing, distorted vocal samples. Starting off the new year right, Jona Ma and Dreems have set the bar high for what’s to come.

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Christian Löffler stuns in remix on Superpoze’s ‘For We the living’

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Earlier this year, the German-enthraller Christian Löffler released a reworked edition of his 2016 album Mare. Brimming with ethereal material, one of its particular standouts was a piano-driven take on “Haul” from the French artist Superpoze. Now, the two are reworking with each other’s material once more as Superpoze’s just released a deluxe edition of his record, For We the living, which features just three remixes, one being from Löffler.

Considering that Löffler resides near the Baltic sea, it makes sense that his music is deeply fluid, enveloping, and vastly amorphous. In his own bio, he describes his music as a combination of “melancholy with euphoria.” He continues, “All my music is connected by a gloomy spirit, which is minted by a warm sincerity. I try to merge all kinds of different acoustic colors to obtain this feeling in my music.” His take on Superpoze’s new deluxe album title track, “For We the Living,” feels very much driven by this aforementioned gloomy spirit. It’s even more mellow than Superpoze’s original, which is surely a difficult feat, and also explores a pleasing, eerily evocative sonic realm.

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Illenium unveils immensely moving piano covers of ‘Awake’ tracks

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Illenium has a uniquely evocative sound design and his rise in EDM is in large part thanks to his embodiment of the beautiful, more deeply introspective side of the genre. For years, the producer has opened the floodgates on gorgeous, sound design juxtaposed with melodic EDM style drops. With the release of his sophomore album Awake, Illenium ventured into a more commercial side of EDM, sure, but also did so without compromising the emotionally-inflicting tendencies of his music.

Now, Illenium fans and lovers of all emotive music will be delighted to find out that an EP of piano covers from Awake has arrived just in time for the holidays. “Beautiful Creatures,” “Fractures,” and “Crawl Outta Love” have all received piano covers thanks to Julien Marchal, Lorcan Rooney, and Lambert respectively. The tunes are incredibly captivating and ones that will awaken its listeners in its delightful production depth.

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Squarepusher constructs alien synths for Nintendo’s new NES system

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Squarepusher has constructed some imaginative synth sounds for Nintendo’s latest classic console spawn—the Super NT—created by Analogue. The Seattle based video game hardware company known as Analogue is dubbing the console as “a reimagining of perhaps the greatest video game system of all time,” and their new boot-up tune summons nostalgic memories of playing Super Nintendo in moldy childhood basements. Squarepusher is certainly an apt producer for the contract, masterfully reinventing the quintessential Nintendo bleeps and 8-bit-esque sounds. The fabled IDM producer released a live album earlier this year called Elektrac and also soundtracks another revised Super Nintendo game called Super Turrican.

 

 

H/T: Pitchfork

 

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Post Malone – Congratulations (Filous Remix)

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After having just delivered a diverse testament to his exuberant production penchant with a new EP — For Love — Dutch singer-songwriter Filous quickly followed suit with an impassioned rework of Cimo Fränkel’s “Never Give Up.” Now, the rising artist has enhanced one of the hottest songs of 2016 with his own approach, and it’s a stirring assemblage of vocal ambiance and scintillating guitar strums.

Filous is consistently pointing to his soothing potential in the indie-electro realm with his dulcetly delivered reworks. With his latest breath of life into Post Malone‘s “Congratulations,” it seems Filous is veering down a pathway that indicates some more “Congratulations” will be in order quite soon.


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Koronis releases poignant neo-classical piece, ‘Winter’

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Jesse Woolston’s Koronis project continues to evolve and adapt at an alarming rate. The New Zealand born, LA-based sound designer and composer first caught our attention with his cinematic drum ‘n’ bass album, The Replicant, back in 2015. Following up with his cerebral concept album Circuits in 2017, he demonstrated a deeper understanding of psychoacoustics, told through the lens of delicate neo-classical compositions.

Now Koronis has returned with a new standalone piece, “Winter,” a beautifully-wrought, minimal piano composition “inspired by the ending of the year and winter season.”

It’s patient and sparse, boasting little more than a raw, poignant piano progression. Ultimately, it’s the kind of measured composition that would make an effortless accompaniment to film or TV.

Listen to “Winter” below:

Shrimpnose unveils emotive new EP, ‘dawn’

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Art somberly mirrors life on Minnesotan producer shrimpnose’s latest offering, the just over eleven minute “dawn (ep).” The artist commemorates his late friend Donnie’s life on the new ambient EP through melancholic yet hopeful soundscapes.

Gradually processing grief over its emotive five tracks, the “dawn” EP opens with the lo-fi title track. After the third minute mark, the first breezy tune “dawn” progresses into the static of the second, dubbed “heroes.” After the glistening third track “since then,” a whispering monologue brings the listener down to earth on its fourth offering “dusk.” Gradually growing hopeful, a stunning display of strings rounds out the EP on its closer “back when.”

The “dawn” EP showcases a gripping display of emotion and merely the tip of the iceberg when it comes to shrimpnose’s talent. The artist has recently played opening slots for the likes of  XXYYXX, TOKiMONSTA, Giraffage, Purity Ring, Troyboi, Ekali, The Geek x Vrv, Eprom and Medasin. shrimpnose is set to close out 2017 with a performance at Snowta NYE 2017 in his home state.

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Heathered Pearls unveils an exuberant apex of ambient techno on ‘Detroit, MI 1997-2001’

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The Ghostly International artist Heathered Pearls has released an exuberant techno EP — Detroit, MI 1997-2001 — that acts as a follow up to his 2015 album Body Complex and a more recent remix of Tycho‘s “Divison.”

Detroit, MI 1997-2001 is a love letter to the city of Detroit. It’s a pulsating melange of both meandering and meticulously crafted ambient techno, pulsating in a fashion that’s very much akin to its Midwestern rave memories. For the project’s Jakub Alexander, “The music pulses like a memory resurfacing, vivid but inexact: a form both familiar and new.”

Immediately obvious in the EP is Alexander’s varied and poised production style. Hailing from a diverse city and serving as an A&R head of a label likely lend way to such accomplishments, but it’s a stunning display of explorative cohesion nonetheless.

Between the swirling atmosphere of “Under The Bridge” to the artist’s befitting sinisterness of “The Packard Plant,” Heathered Pearls solidifies his amorphous production capabilities on Detroit, MI 1997-2001, all while honoring an illustrious city that’s lent its way to this pearlescent moniker.

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Baile releases haunting ambient soundcore album ‘Patient History’

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Reed Kackley, better known as Baile, has released a new ambient album, Patient History. The album serves as an ambient backdrop for NYC-based dancer Natalie Johnson’s movement memoire of the same name. Johnson’s memoire is a solo interpretive dance act produced and enacted herself in which she creates a physical manifestation of Baile’s symphonic melodies. In Johnson’s words, ‘Patient History’ is “the estrangement and grief of a dancer lost to injury, the invisible experiences inflicting isolation born from common and chronic crumbling.”

Containing ten full length tracks, with some extending as long as eight minutes, Baile takes the listener on a sonic journey through heartbreak and loss, as his productions guide carefully as each integral component starts to construct a haunting reality. There’s something incredibly human about exploring life’s most ominous anomalies, and death is the ultimate question explored by Baile. “I’m always striving for a really open, clear mix where every nuance of each sound can be heard” he says.

“This evening-length work, my first evening production in five years, is not explicitly a dance show, but more of a multi-sensory one woman show” says Johnson about the debut of her movement memoire, “I want to invite an audience to talk about deeper and darker subjects, to laugh at me, certainly laugh with me, and hopefully allow space for reflection while taking witness of what can only be described as my intentions towards honesty and embodiment. Despite the alluding to despair, the show is not without comedy as even silly people experience chronic humanity.”

While Patient History is certainly not an easy album to digest, it is rather cleansing for those seeking such a cathartic experience.

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