STREAM NOW: Watch REZZ hypnotize the Circuit Ground stage at EDC Las Vegas

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STREAM NOW: Watch REZZ hypnotize the Circuit Ground stage at EDC Las VegasRezz Porter Robinsin Divinity Remi Live Debut

After a stellar 2018, REZZ is back on the festival grind with new music to share. The Canadian downtempo space bass boss recently released a new single, “Dark Age,” in preparation for her new EP Beyond The Senses set to drop July 24.

REZZ is known for her cult of loyal followers and hypnotic presence. The drumming low ends pair nicely with haunting melodies curating a contrast of anxiety and power complimented nicely by mesmerizing visuals. Her new project will reportedly “exudes more depth in my songs’ melody and structure.”

To see the REZZ in action at 12:30am Sunday morning (May 19), tune into the EDC livestream below.

Photo Credit: Rukes

STREAM NOW: Watch NGHTMRE destroy the Cosmic Meadow stage at EDC Las Vegas

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STREAM NOW: Watch NGHTMRE destroy the Cosmic Meadow stage at EDC Las VegasShaq NGHTMRE

NGHTMRE thrives on heavy, trap-inspired bass productions—it’s where he lives. He’s collaborated with a grip of top hip-hop talents, recently dropping a VIP edit of his A$AP Ferg collaboration, “REDLIGHT.” The Gud Vibrations helmer is also fresh off of a heavy bass posse cut with Shaquille O’Neal and Lil Jon on “BANG.”

Last year, NGHTMRE began a new label with Slander, Gud Vibrations. Since then, the label has grown a steady reputation for crafting high energy dance-floor heaters. NGHTMRE’s set, broadcasting live from the Cosmic Meadow at 1:30am PST (Sunday), will surly keep those good vibrations at high levels.

Tune into the EDC livestream below.

Skrillex Announces Surprise Set @ EDC Las Vegas 2019

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The post Skrillex Announces Surprise Set @ EDC Las Vegas 2019 is published on LIVE music blog.

Skrillex just dropped a little hint of what he has planned tonight on his Twitter account… Spare an hour? @PasqualeRotella — Skrillex (@Skrillex) May 18, 2019 He’ll be playing tonight at Electric Daisy Carnival in Las Vegas, which normally wouldn’t be a big surprise except he’s been a bit quiet as of late except for […]

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Watch Madonna Perform With Quavo at Eurovision

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She did their collaborative track “Future” and her 1989 classic “Like a Prayer” for her controversial set in Israel

Watch Madonna’s Controversial Eurovision Performance

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Madonna performed at Eurovision 2019 in Tel Aviv, Israel tonight. Her decision to appear at the song contest incited controversy earlier this week since Palestinians and the international boycott, divestment, and sanctions movement have called on viewers to boycott the televised event. More »

Stereo Underground evokes stoicism in debut LP, ‘The Art of Silence’

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Stereo Underground evokes stoicism in debut LP, ‘The Art of Silence’The Art Of Silence Artwork Cover

Stereo Underground, born Yariv Etzion, has always been somewhat of an enigmatic talent despite his far-reaching influence. A co-founder of Israel’s BPM College, now one of the country’s premier musical institutions, Etzion and echoes of his expertise are already present among the thousands of students he’s taught over the years. It wasn’t until 2009, however, that he began shining a light on his productions under his current alias.

Now, a decade-long track record of excellence in the house arena has led to the mysterious artist’s most expressive project to date: The Art of Silence. The album marks his first foray into longform composition, and unveils Etzion’s stoic pedagogy across its 11 tracks.

The Art of Silence lands on the distinguished Australian imprint, Balance, setting expectations high for the unencumbered debut. Stereo Underground demonstrates he’s here to rise to the challenge, offering up a spacey, cinematic record meant to be savored, to be paid attention to. Its haunting, ambient opener “Flying Glow” toys with empty space, as the title suggests. Sparse soundscapes are punctured by dissonant notes that hit the ears at different angles, making for quite a textured piece despite its minimalism. It catalyzes a deeply contemplative mindframe—a theme that persists through the considerable length of the album. The Art of Silence is certainly evocative of the lonesome, countryside setting within which it was written.

Etzion’s penchant for precise aural architecture enters as the album builds in intensity. No element feels jarring; emotions swirl. “Above the Sea of Fog,” for example, feels a bit wistful and nostalgic, perhaps bearing images of young love or carefree childhood reverie. According to Etzion himself, the track was inspired by a painting of a similar name, created at the height of the Romanticism movement. Its warm, analog synths and cinematic arrangement feel fitting in any case. “Echoes,” inspired by Pink Floyd, is psychedelic doused in subtle melancholy, illustrated through its minor key and undulating, legato notation. “Wanderlust” feels like an adventure, taking listeners on a 7-minute ride that emulates the excitement one gets when traveling to new places.

Ultimately, the album is an introspective, aural meditation. Stereo Underground takes his audience with him as he reflects on his own life and place in the world. In doing so, The Art of Silence urges his fans to do the same.

Order a copy of ‘The Art of Silence,’ out on Balance, here

Watch Jamila Woods Play 3 Songs On CBS This Morning

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Jamila Woods released her fantastic new album LEGACY! LEGACY! last week and today she appeared on CBS This Morning to perform a few highlights. Woods broke out “Baldwin,” “Holy,” and “Zora,” and her voice sounded as stunning as it always does. Check out the performance below. More »

New Grateful Dead Photography Book: ‘Jerry Garcia – Secret Space of Dreams’ by Jay Blakesberg

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The post New Grateful Dead Photography Book: ‘Jerry Garcia – Secret Space of Dreams’ by Jay Blakesberg is published on LIVE music blog.

The Grateful Dead photographer extraordinaire Jay Blakesberg has announced a new photography book featuring archival photos of Jerry Garcia, due out this October 1st, 2019. Super Excited to announce my newest Book Project. Coming out October 1, 2019 is my new coffee table book: JERRY GARCIA – SECRET SPACE OF DREAMS. 208 pages – hard […]

The post New Grateful Dead Photography Book: ‘Jerry Garcia – Secret Space of Dreams’ by Jay Blakesberg appeared first on LIVE music blog.

Saturday Night Session 021: Elephante opens up about being a vocalist on more music moving forward and gives fans a look into a day in his life

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Saturday Night Session 021: Elephante opens up about being a vocalist on more music moving forward and gives fans a look into a day in his lifeElephante

Few moments are more sacred than the reprieve Saturday night provides from the daily grind of school and work. Its importance is meant to be emphasized, and thus, a feature dedicated to “doing the night right” was born. Saturday Night Sessions are set around energizing mixes meant to get the party started. New or old, each episode has one cornerstone thing in similarity: they serve as the perfect backdrop for the weekend pregame.

Every artist has a unique story when it comes to their foray into music. Some come into notoriety carrying out their lifelong dream of becoming an artist and others stumble into the career accidentally. Tim Wu, who is more popularly known as DJ and music producer Elephante, found himself sitting alone in a music studio at 25 through neither of these paths. He admits that, would he have been able to go back and tell his 16-year-old self that he would end up becoming a DJ and music producer, he wouldn’t have believed it.

Wu grew up an avid John Mayer fan, which ultimately inspired him to play in bands and write songs that he would perform on the acoustic guitar at local showcases in his hometown of Ann Arbor, Michigan. Music has always been an incredibly big part of his life, but Tennis ultimately landed him at Harvard University where he played and locked in a career in consulting after graduation. When he wasn’t at his consulting job, Wu discovered electronic music production, and he became hooked. The more he produced music, the more miserable he became at his job to the point where he quit. He was so concerned about his parent’s reaction that he spent over a year lying to them about the decision to became a full time musician.

He reminisces on telling his parents he had stopped working as a consultant to pursue music, stating, “I think they were mostly confused, and obviously worried. Like what do you mean you’re gonna be a DJ? Can you get healthcare doing that? But at the end of the day, I think they knew how unhappy I was and that it was something I had to do, and were mostly just hoping I didn’t get hooked on heroin or something. I mean, can you imagine moving to a different country, working your ass off your whole life to give your kids a better life, and then having said kid tell you they were quitting their job to be a DJ? I would have murdered me. Now though they are super stoked – I brought them on stage for a couple shows and fans were asking for pictures with them and stuff, so I think they get a kick out of it. My mom still reminds me every time we talk not to do heroin though.”

The rest is history with Wu’s production career, although those who are familiar with the producer’s music would hardly be surprised to learn that Wu’s artistry grew out of his love of songwriting as a teenager. In a world where commercial crossover releases dominate the charts, Wu has found a way to bring vocals front and center in his releases without producing a stream of three note drops that leave the vocals and vocals alone to differentiate one track from the next. His body of work spans for folky “Come Back For You” featuring Matluck to beautiful “Catching On” featuring Nevve.

Wu recently released his own cover of “Shooting Stars,” which is the second release he has put out with his own vocals. Wu speaks about the decision to utilize his own vocals on his music, noting, “I was a singer-songwriter before I started producing music, so I’ve been singing for forever. But it was really important that my voice was the right one for the song, and I wasn’t just singing it for vanity’s sake. If someone else could sing it better, I’d have them do it instead.”

Those who have seen Wu perform live will recognize his rendition of the track, which has been cut in and out of his live performances since he made the cover in 2014. Now that he has begun to release music with his own vocals, Wu has developed a stream of covers that he will be putting out over the next few months.

Wu gives fans insight into his decision to utilize his own vocals, which is a decision more producers have seemingly been making over the past few years thanks to artists like Calvin Harris and The Chainsmokers singing on their own original releases. He states, “Especially after The Chainsmokers had so much success with Drew singing – there were a bunch of DJs who were like ‘oh I can sing too,’ and some really can, and others were like… should you though? And I wanted to make sure I wasn’t just doing it for the sake of it. Producing the songs I sing feels somewhat different, just because I know I always can go back and change the line.”

2019 will be a big year for Wu, who notes he has multiple projects in the pipeline. For now, he is still inducing euphoria through his live sets and original releases, including a high energy and genre-bending Saturday Night Session that takes listeners through a dynamic journey. When asked what kind of a Saturday night the mix is going to get listener’s ready for, Wu states, ” The best Saturday night of their life!!! You were planning on taking it easy, but instead you listen and are inspired to go out and you meet the love of your life and go get pizza with them and on a whim buy Powerball tickets and you win a billion dollars. That kind of Saturday night.”

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Where do you draw inspiration from when you sit down to produce music? Can you give us some insight into your creative process?
Honestly, sounds and melodies and lyrics kinda just pop into my head at random times, sometimes in the shower, when I’m about to fall asleep in a hotel, when I’m listening to music or reading or whatever. I have no idea where exactly it comes from though. I’ve learned to write down or record a voice memo any time one of these little moments strikes, so by the time I’m sitting down in the studio I have a bunch of ideas that I’m excited to work on. Once I’m there, it’s all about just really diving in an exploring that idea – I’m always asking myself what comes next? What would be cool with this? I try to work away from the computer as much as possible – playing piano, jamming on guitar, writing/drawing in notebooks, whatever. And I just try to keep finding that next little cool moment, that next little sound, and then on the good days I come to 8 hours later and something exists that didn’t before. On the bad days the voices in my head are silent, and it’s like well, guess I’ll try again tomorrow.

“Glass Mansion” was your first time singing on one of your songs, and rumor has it you’ll be doing this more often moving forward. Were you nervous at all to jump into also being a vocalist? Does producing a track with your own vocals feel different than producing a track with someone else singing on it?
I was, but for different reasons than you’d expect. I was a singer-songwriter before I started producing music, so I’ve been singing for forever. But it was really important that my voice was the right one for the song, and I wasn’t just singing it for vanity’s sake. If someone else could sing it better, I’d have them do it instead. So it took a long time for me to write a song that I knew I absolutely had to sing, and really feel confident in that, and “Glass Mansion” was the first time I was like, ‘I have to do this.’ Especially after The Chainsmokers had so much success with Drew singing – there were a bunch of DJs who were like ‘oh I can sing too,’ and some really can, and others were like… should you though? And I wanted to make sure I wasn’t just doing it for the sake of it. Producing the songs I sing feels somewhat different, just because I know I always can go back and change the line, or change the phrasing or whatever, which can actually be kind of a negative. But over the years I’ve gotten better at understanding what works and really building the song around the vocals, whether it’s me or someone else, and not just slapping a beat over an acapella.

Do you have any guilty pleasures?
Yes, eating almond butter out of the tub. I’m doing that right now actually.

When you aren’t touring, what does a normal day in your life look like?
Ideally I’ll play some pickup basketball in the morning, then eat and hit the studio. I fucking love the studio. It’s what I’d want to do even if I wasn’t making a living doing it. You know how when you’re a kid you have things that you had to finish your homework before you can do, and that’s the thing that gets you through the day? That’s making music for me. It’s so much fun I’m still kinda baffled that I get paid to do it. 

You have a really interesting story- you went to Harvard, got a consulting job, and then quit to pursue music full time. You didn’t tell your parents that you quit for a while though. How did they react when you first told them, and how do they feel about your career as a musician now that you’ve become so successful?
I think they were mostly confused, and obviously worried. Like what do you mean you’re gonna be a DJ? Can you get healthcare doing that? But at the end of the day, I think they knew how unhappy I was and that it was something I had to do, and were mostly just hoping I didn’t get hooked on heroin or something. I mean, can you imagine moving to a different country, working your ass off your whole life to give your kids a better life, and then having said kid tell you they were quitting their job to be a DJ? I would have murdered me. Now though they are super stoked – I brought them on stage for a couple shows and fans were asking for pictures with them and stuff, so I think they get a kick out of it. My mom still reminds me every time we talk not to do heroin though.

What is one thing your fans don’t know about you?
I’m allergic to bees? And dogs and cats and horses and pretty much anything with fur. Which sucks cuz I love dogs. Can’t have it all.

What kind of a Saturday night is your Saturday Night Session mix going to get listeners ready for?
Best Saturday night of their life!!! You were planning on taking it easy, but instead you listen and are inspired to go out and you meet the love of your life and go get pizza with them and on a whim buy Powerball tickets and you win a billion dollars. That kind of Saturday night.

Weekend Rewind: Anna Lunoe and Alison Wonderland claim EDC history as first female solo main-stage acts

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Weekend Rewind: Anna Lunoe and Alison Wonderland claim EDC history as first female solo  main-stage actsEDC LV 2016 Kinetic Field

With another chapter of EDC Las Vegas underway, Dancing Astronaut looks back at a watershed moment in the festival’s 20+ years running: Anna Lunoe and Alison Wonderland taking the main stage for ransom in 2016. They were the first solo female acts to do so.

Lunoe, known for her unorthodox—looney, if you will—strain of house and club stylings, isn’t necessarily your run-of-the-mill main stage artist; she herself attested the notion in an interview with EDC organizers at Insomniac shortly following the momentous appearance. Nevertheless, the OWSLA-aligned, Australian-bred Lunoe dug deep into her HYPERHOUSE crates for what proved a scene-altering set under the Electric Sky, despite some minor sound interference from the festival’s audio techs letting the opening ceremony music bleed in. But Lunoe, sleep-deprived and still acclimating herself to brand new CDJs, bulldozed through the accidental interruption like the tireless talent she’s proven herself to be behind the decks for over a decade.

Another culturally disruptive (for the better) Aussie and classically trained cellist, by the name of Alison Wonderland, further solidified the long-time-coming female ferocity sweeping over EDC, taking the main stage under her more-than-adept wing that Sunday. The melodic/experimental trap talent’s indelible legacy amongst women in dance music is still ever-blossoming. In 2018, she took home the highest paycheck in Coachella history to be issued to a female DJ, following her Sahara Tent performance, which amassed over 20,000 awe-stricken spectators. An outspoken advocate for mental health, Wonderland also secured an auspicious cover story this year for Billboard, wherein she traced her often tumultuous rise to EDM superstardom, and accredited music as her most vital vessel for forging human connection.

Here’s to these two torrentially talented tastemakers—as well as all the other convention-confronting women in dance music carving out a path for the often-overlooked female talent across the globe. Though the path is still largely untrodden, as Wonderland this year serves as the only female act on the main stage roster. The EDC Vegas side stages want for naught, however, as some of the most in-demand women in dance music (and acts in general), including REZZ, TOKiMONSTA, and Amelie Lens are effectively offsetting the overwhelmingly male 2019 makeup.